Ben with Jay Brazeau and Babs Chula

Bio & Resumé

Bio - click here
Acting bio - click here
Writing & Directing bio - click here
Resumé (on Imdb) - click here

BEN RATNER - Biography

A professional actor for 25 years, Ratner started teaching in 1994 as a protégé of internationally acclaimed acting teacher and author Ivana Chubbuck. He opened his own "Haven Studio" in 2002 and rapidly earned a reputation for his highly demanding and thoroughly rewarding scene study classes. Today, he is sought after as a coach, teacher and mentor to many of Canada's busiest actors, a great number of whom are working internationally.While teaching in both Vancouver and Toronto, Ratner's own acting, writing and directing career continues to flourish. With over 100 film and TV credits and numerous awards and nominations under his belt, he most recently received the 2013 "John Juliani Award of Excellence" from UBCP/ACTRA. A Jesse Award nominee for his portrayal of "Bobby" in American Buffalo, Ratner returned to the stage in 2012 to co-star in Dinner with Friends, and in 2014 he directed the Canadian Premiere of Tommy Smith's White Hot, both of which opened to rave reviews.

Ratner wrote, directed and co-starred in the feature film Moving Malcolm which won him a "Best First Feature Award" at the 2003 Montreal Film Festival. He directed an episode of CTV's Robson Arms in 2005, and wrote and directed the short film Power Lunch in 2008. Most recently, he wrote and directed the feature film Down River, which has won 8 awards to date, including "Best World Showcase" at the 2014 Soho International Film Festival in New York. He is currently developing his next feature film Original 6, a TV series called Rachel, and is also producing Big Feelings, a documentary about a group of his acting students sharing true stories from their lives, and how this process transforms their experiences into creative empowerment.

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BEN RATNER - Actor Biography

An incredibly dynamic and versatile actor, Ben Ratner has attracted much critical acclaim for his work in film, television and theatre.

Having worked extensively in Canada and the US, Ben’s film appearances include lead and supporting roles in both independent and studio features. Among his lauded film performances are Carl Bessai’s Sisters & Brothers (nominated for a Leo Award for Best Actor in a Feature Film), Fathers & Sons (nominated for a Leo Award for Best Actor in a Feature Film), Bruce Sweeney’s Last Wedding (won the Film Can Best Actor Award, nominated for a Leo Award and a Canadian Comedy Award, and was named Best Canadian Actor by The Vancouver Film Critics’ Circle), Dirty (nominated for a Leo Award for Best Actor in a Feature Film), Looking for Leonard (named Best Supporting Actor by the Vancouver Film Critics’ Circle) and Ross Weber’s Mount Pleasant (won the Leo Award for Best Actor and was nominated for Best Canadian Actor by The Vancouver Film Critics’ Circle). Ben also received rave reviews for his leading roles in Mike Rohl’s Zacharia, Randall Cole’s 19 Months and Moving Malcolm, which Ratner also wrote and directed. Other films include Wrongfully Accused, Good Boy!, Gray Matters (opposite Heather Graham), Man About Town (opposite Ben Affleck), and Numb (opposite Matthew Perry).

Ben has appeared in over 50 television shows including series regular roles on Kingdom Hospital and DaVinci’s City Hall. He has also given many exceptional guest-starring performances on series such as The Collector (for which he won the Leo Award for Best Guest Performance), Mysterious Ways (nominated for a Leo Award for Best Guest Performance), The Twilight Zone and Becker opposite Ted Danson. Ben most recently appeared in Continuum, Hell on Wheels, Arctic Air and Eureka and he won the Leo Award for Best Guest Performance in a Dramatic Series for Flashpoint.

Also an accomplished stage actor, Ben’s credits include his self penned one man shows Cherished and Forgotten and The Smell of Pokey Dying, Frank Borg’s The Chalk Player, and David Mamet’s American Buffalo, for which Ben was nominated for a Jessie Richardson Award. More recently, Ben starred in Donald Margulies’ Dinner With Friends and John Patrick Shanley’s Italian American Reconciliation both of which garnered him rave reviews.

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BEN RATNER - Writer/Director Biography

Ben Ratner made his directorial debut with his self-penned feature film, Moving Malcolm. The film was awarded a Grand Jury Award at the 2004 Washington DC Independent Film Festival and won Best First Feature at the 2003 Montreal World Film Festival before opening theatrically in Canada. Most recently, Down River, which he wrote and directed, won Most Popular Canadian Film at the 2013 Vancouver International Film Festival, Best BC Film at the 2014 Vancouver Film Critics Circle Awards, Best World Showcase Feature at the 2014 Soho International Film Festival in New York, and received 13 Leo Award nominations in 2014, winning five, including Best Picture and Best Screenplay for Ratner.

In 2005, Ben directed an episode of the television series Robson Arms for CTV and, wrote and directed a short film called Power Lunch in 2008.

For the stage, Ben directed the Canadian Premiere of Christopher Shinn’s Dying City in 2009 and the Canadian Premiere of Tommy Smith’s White Hot in 2014. He also wrote and performed in two different one man shows Cherished and Forgotten and The Smell of Pokey Dying.

As a writer, Ben co-wrote, co-produced and co-starred in the short films Table
Manners
, which was awarded a DGC Kickstart grant, and Rock, co- starring the late Blues legend Long John Baldry. Ben created and co-wrote the half hour pilot Under New Management, developed by CTV, Goode Manor, a half hour pilot developed by CBC and co-created with renowned Canadian director Jerry Ciccoritti and, the one-hour drama Pros & Cons, co-created with Bruce Ramsay and developed by CTV. Currently in development is his next feature film Original 6 as well as a documentary called, Big Feelings.

(Download Ben's Headshot - hi res jpeg (3.9 mb))